News

Open letter on the European Year of 2021

9 July 2020

Public transport is facing an unprecedented crisis. The COVID-19 public health crisis has resulted in an estimated €40 billion shortfall in revenue, owing to a dramatic decrease in passenger numbers while services were maintained to support frontline workers.

The European Year of 2021 is an opportunity to support public transportation in this time of crisis. An extension of scope to public transportation services, such as urban rail, trams and metros, can play a valuable role in promoting collective modes and return to previous service levels, while ensuring the safety of passengers and workers.

Eurocities is pleased to join forces with the international organisation for public transportation (UITP) to send an open letter to the European Parliament with our proposals.

Eurocities and UITP recommend:

  • Expanding the scope of the European Year of 2021 to include public transport services, such as urban rail, trams, and metros to support sustainable end-to-end mobility and logistics
  • Raise awareness and develop projects to renew, modernise and encourage the use of urban rail services and public transportation fleets

Read the full letter here:

European_Year_of_2021

Contact

Thomas Willson Policy Advisor and Project Coordinator (Mobility, Air Quality)

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