News

Cities ready to take in refugee children

23 April 2020

Cities across Europe are ready to welcome children from overcrowded refugee camps on the Greek islands. In a letter addressed to the presidents of the European Commission, European Council and European Parliament, they offer to take in unaccompanied children and provide better conditions for them.

“We need to help, and we are here to offer that help,” reads the letter. “Europe needs to step up to provide shelter, comfort and safety.”

The letter is signed by Amersfoort, Amsterdam, Arnhem, Barcelona, Bruges, Ghent, Groningen, Leipzig, Nuremberg, Tilburg, and Utrecht which offer to relocate some of the roughly 5,500 unaccompanied children to their cities.

“We are ready to receive them! Each of our cities pledges to accommodate a fair share and abide by the principles of solidarity and responsibility as expressed through the Eurocities Solidarity Cities Initiative”, state the cities. “We are ready to work with the national and European authorities, to find the necessary relocation arrangements and realise accommodation solutions.”

Eurocities Solidarity Initiative

Within the framework of the Solidarity Cities Initiative launched in 2016, Eurocities has supported cities committed to solidarity in the field of refugee reception and integration. Abiding by the principles of humanity and responsibility, the members of this initiative are calling for cooperation among European cities to create more cohesive and inclusive societies.

Read the full letter below and as an attachment.

Public Statement from European Cities on Vulnerable Children in the refugee situation in Greece

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